An artist rendering of the Cassini spacecraft entering orbit around Saturn. The two-story, $3.4 billion spacecraft carrying a load of deadly plutonium will zoom within 725 miles of Earth August 17, 1999 to gain momentum for the final leg of its meandering, seven-year voyage to Saturn. Cassini's return, two years after NASA launched the largest and most expensive unmanned spacecraft ever, poses virtually no risk, mission officials say. The probe will approach Earth at about 35,000 mph. Its speed will increase by about 11,000 mph after the swingby. (NASA)
Tudomány

Cassini: az űrkutatás történetének egyik legjelentősebb szerkezete volt

Marjai János
Marjai János

képszerkesztő. 2017. 09. 15. 15:07

Workers install a Radioisotope Thermal Generator (RTG) in the Cassini spacecraft late 10 October on launch pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL. The RTG will be used to generate electricity on the Cassini's seven-year deep space journey to the planet Saturn. The plutonium-powered spacecraft will take off 13 October. AFP PHOTO/NASA / AFP PHOTO / NASA / NASA
Fotó: NASA
This undated file photo released by JPL and NASA shows the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft equipped with an Italian-made radio antenna (top) and the Huygens Probe (covered in gold). The spacecraft is scheduled for launch 13 October and is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Cassini spacecraft is due to arrive in Saturn's orbit in 2004. A Florida-based public interest group said 08 October it has filed a lawsuit challenging the launch because according to the group the plutonium-fueled spacecraft poses a health and environmental risk. Cassini carries some 32 kilos (72 pounds) of plutonium, the most nuclear fuel ever launched into space.   AFP PHOTO/JPL/NASA / AFP PHOTO / JPL/NASA
Fotó: NASA
Kevin Marsh of Mendocino, CA, reattaches a protest sign on the security fence at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station 12 October. Marsh was the only person protesting the launch of the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft with its power supply of 72 pounds of plutonium that is set to blast off early 13 October on a Titan 4-B rocket. The banner reads "Cancel Cassini No Nukes in Space."AFP PHOTO/ TONY RANZE / AFP PHOTO / TONY RANZE
Fotó: AFP/Tony Ranze
The Titan 4B launch vehicle blasts off launch pad 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 15 October, carrying the Cassini spacecraft into to space. The Cassini is sent on a seven-year deep space journey to the planet Saturn.    AFP PHOTO    Bruce WEAVER / AFP PHOTO / BRUCE WEAVER
Fotó: AFP/Bruce Weaver
The Titan 4B launch vehicle pierces early morning clouds above Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida 15 October as it climbs into space from launch pad 40 carrying the Cassini space probe in this time exposure photograph. The Cassini will be sent on a seven-year deep space journey to the planet Saturn.    AFP PHOTO    Bruce WEAVER / AFP PHOTO / BRUCE WEAVER
Fotó: AFP/Bruce Weaver
This Cassini spacecraft image released by NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute shows icy geysers spewing from the south polar region of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Cassini spacecraft collected science data on the mysterious geysers and recorded new images of its surface during a close flyby, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory said March 13, 2008. The pass on March 12 brought Cassini as close as 30 miles to the surface of the moon. It went through the icy geysers at 32,000 mph (51,499kph) and an altitude of 120 miles (193kms), the lab said.     AFP PHOTO/NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute    =GETTY OUT= / AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Fotó: NASA
Fotó: NASA
This NASA Cassini Spacecraft image released 02 June, 2004 shows Saturn as seen by Cassini 10 May, at a distance of 27.2 million kilometers (16.9 million miles).  The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. AFP PHOTO/NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute / AFP PHOTO / NASA / HO
Fotó: NASA
Recent Cassini images of Saturn's moon Enceladus backlit by the sun show the fountain-like sources of the fine spray of material that towers over the south polar region. This image released 28 Novemebr, 2005, was taken looking more or less broadside at the "tiger stripe" fractures observed in earlier Enceladus images. It shows discrete plumes of a variety of apparent sizes above the limb of the moon. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. AFP PHOTO/HO/NASA/JPL/GETTY OUT
 / AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL / HO
Fotó: NASA
In this rare image taken on July 19, 2013, the wide-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft has captured Saturn's rings and our planet Earth and its moon in the same frame. It is only one footprint in a mosaic of 33 footprints covering the entire Saturn ring system (including Saturn itself). At each footprint, images were taken in different spectral filters for a total of 323 images: some were taken for scientific purposes and some to produce a natural color mosaic. This is the only wide-angle footprint that has the Earth-moon system in it. (Photo by NASA/Handout/Corbis via Getty Images)
Fotó: NASA
Világûr, 2017. szeptember 13.
Az amerikai Repülésügyi és Ûrkutatási Hivatal, a NASA által közreadott, a Cassini ûrszonda által 2015. május 21-én készített felvétel a Szaturnusz Dione nevû holdjáról az óriásbolygó elõtt. Az ûrszonda 2004. július 1-jén állt pályára a Szaturnusz körül, ahonnan azóta több mint 453 ezer képet küldött a bolygóról és annak gyûrû- és holdrendszerérõl. A szonda várhatóan szeptember 15-én fejezi be küldetését, amikor több mint 120 ezer kilométeres óránkénti sebességgel csapódva a Szaturnusz gázlégkörébe megsemmisül. (MTI/EPA/NASA/JPL-Caltech)
Fotó: NASA
This NASA image released June 15, 2017 was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 9, 2017, using a spectral filter that preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 938 nanometers, as Cassini obtained the view at a distance of about 315,000 miles (507,000 kilometers) from Saturn's moon Titan.


Compared to earlier in Cassini's mission, most of the surface in the moon's northern high latitudes is now illuminated by the sun. (See PIA08363 for a view of the northern hemisphere from 2007.) Summer solstice in the Saturn system occurred on May 24, 2017.



NASA's Cassini spacecraft sees bright methane clouds drifting in the summer skies of Saturn's moon Titan, along with dark hydrocarbon lakes and seas clustered around the north pole.Compared to earlier in Cassini's mission, most of the surface in the moon's northern high latitudes is now illuminated by the sun. Summer solstice in the Saturn system occurred on May 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / NASA / Handout / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
Fotó: NASA
This NASA handout image released 16 October 2006 shows a view from the Cassini spacecraft as it looks through the dense B ring toward a distant star in an image from a recent stellar occultation observation. These observations point the camera toward a star whose brightness is well known. Then, as Cassini watches the rings pass in front, the star's light fluctuates, providing information about the concentrations of ring particles within the various radial features in the rings. This view looks toward the unlit side of the rings from about 35 degrees above the ringplane. The star's image is partly saturated, causing the vertical lines that extend up and down. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on 26 September, 2006 at a distance of approximately 543,000 kilometers (338,000 miles) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 106 degrees. Image scale is about 3 kilometers (2 miles) per pixel. AFP PHOTO/NASA/JPL/SPACE SCIENCE INSTITUTE =GETTY OUT=

 / AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL / HO
Fotó: NASA
This NASA handout image obtained October 19, 2009 shows Saturn during an equinox captured by the robot explorer Cassini. The images comprising the mosaic, taken over about eight hours, were extensively processed before being joined together. With no enhancement, the rings would be essentially invisible in this mosaic. To improve their visibility, the dark right half of the rings has been brightened relative to the brighter left half by a factor of three, and then the whole ring system has been brightened by a factor of 20 relative to the planet. So the dark half of the rings is 60 times brighter, and the bright half 20 times brighter, than they would have appeared if the entire system, planet included, could have been captured in a single image.The images were taken on August 12, 2009, beginning about 1.25 days after exact equinox, using the red, green and blue spectral filters of the wide angle camera and were combined to create this natural color view. The images were obtained at a distance of approximately 526,000 miles from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 74 degrees. Image scale is 31 miles per pixel. AFP PHOTO/NASA/JPL/SPACE/RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / AFP PHOTO / NASA / HO
Fotó: NASA
A crescent Saturn appears nestled within encircling rings in this Cassini spacecraft image provided by NASA on November 23, 2010. Clouds swirl through the atmosphere of the planet and a barely visible Prometheus orbits between the planet's main rings and its the thin F ring. Saturn's moon Prometheus appears as a speck above the rings near the middle of the image. This view looks toward the southern, unilluminated side of the rings from about 3 degrees below the ringplane.The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera on Sept. 14, 2010, and was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.6 million miles, or 2.6 million kilometers, from Saturn and at a sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 100 degrees. AFP PHOTO/NASA/JPL/SPACE SCIENCE INSTITUTE/HANDOUT/RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / AFP PHOTO / NASA / HO
Fotó: NASA
This true-color simulated view of Jupiter released 30 December, 2000 by NASA is composed of four images taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on 07 December, 2000. To illustrate what Jupiter would have looked like if the cameras had a field-of-view large enough to capture the entire planet, the cylindrical map was projected onto a globe. Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science in Washington, D.C.  AFP PHOTO/NASA / AFP PHOTO / NASA / NASA
Fotó: NASA
This NASA handout released August 20, 2015 shows the rough and icy crescent of Saturn's moon Dione in this view taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on the outbound leg of its last close flyby of the icy moon. North on Dione is up. The image was obtained in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on August 17, 2015. The view was acquired at distances ranging from approximately 37,000 miles (59,000 kilometers) to 47,000 miles (75,000 kilometers) from Dione  == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / HANDOUT / NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute "/ NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS == / AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI / --
Fotó: NASA
This NASA image obtained November 20, 2013, taken by the Cassini spacecraft shows a view that looks toward the sunlit side of the rings of Saturn from about 18 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on August 12, 2013 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 728 nanometers.The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 994,000 miles (1.6 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 57 miles (92 kilometers) per pixel. AFP PHOTO/NASA/HANDOUT
=RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE-MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute" - NO MARKETING NO ADVETISING CAMPAIGNS-DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS= 
 / AFP PHOTO / NASA / HANDOUT
Fotó: NASA
IN SPACE - AUGUST 18: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), looking toward the sunlit side of the rings, Saturn's rings and the icy moon Enceladus are seen in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 18, 2015. Saturn's night side (top C), is illuminated by sunlight reflected off the rings. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 87,000 miles from Enceladus. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
Fotó: NASA
IN SPACE - JANUARY 28: In this handout image provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), this view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings and was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 28, 2016. The 2,980-mile-wide division in Saturn's rings (seen between the bright B ring and dimmer A ring) was acquired at a distance of approximately 740,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) from Saturn. Between April and September 2017, Cassini will plunge repeatedly through the gap that separates the planet from the rings. The Cassini mission is a cooperative project of NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Italian Space Agency. (Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute via Getty Images)
Fotó: NASA
Fotó: NASA
Fotó: NASA
Forrás: NASA
Forrás: NASA
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